Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art Exhibition Review


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This exhibition is running at the National Gallery, Trafalgar Square until tomorrow (22nd May) which explores the impact that Eugene Delacroix had on fellow artists and the up and coming artists after his death. I always like to go to see museums and art exhibitions because it’s all about learning new things and discovering a part of history and I enjoy that experience. I received some free tickets (worth £20 each) and I don’t think I would have paid to go and see the exhibition or at leasg wouldnt have paid mord than £12, as I’ve said before I love doing free things to save money!

The exhibition was a lot bigger than I expected, it was comprised of 6 rooms with about 10 or so paintings in each room, some with more, some with less, and there was also a cinema showing an explanatory video of the collection and the life of Delacroix. I had briefly heard of this artist before in other exhibitions but I went in basically knowing nothing of who he was. Considering he was such an influence to other artists such as Renoir, Matisse, Van Gogh, and many more I was suprised that I didn’t know already. He was essentially the first to really begin experimenting with more creative and unusual painting techniques and colours, and for most of his life he was completely disregarded and shamed for his paintings. Most of the paintings that I saw in the exhibition were so beautiful, some were very unusual and there were a few that were too abstract or foggy for my personal taste. But for the majority of the paintings that I saw I found it strange for them to be treated by the community at the time with such negativity. Delacroix was clearly a true great, and many of the artists that followed him used his styles for their inspirations. I remember a quote said “there is an element of Delacroix in all of us” and many revered him as a kind of God. The styles that he used varied to the point that entire artistic movements such as impressionism derived from one of the methods used by Delacroix.

My favourite paintings in the exhibition were Bathers, Immortality, and The Death of Sardanapalus. I choose these three, made by other artists in homage to Delacroix, because the intensity of colours and details really drew me in, but this is present in other paintings, what made these special was the arrangement of the figures and the subject matter was more interesting to me. Bathers was a beautiful scene in nature, with light pouring in from a ceiling of highly detailed trees, and nude females looking flirtatious and inviting. Immortality was a large painting of an Angel holding a vine of colourful flowers and it was just beautiful, it just is! The Death if Sardanapalus however, was a painting with a lot of things going on, concubines were being killed and the Kings possessions were being destroyed upon his instruction before his suicide, I liked how all of the aspects came together and could spend a long time looking at all the different things present.

As the event ends tomorrow there isn’t really much point to recommend visiting it but I would recommend researching into the art of Delacroix if you are interested in art!

Stephanie

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About swix91

24 year old professional View all posts by swix91

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